Before and after school clubs
For 5-19 year olds and children with SEND
If you're going back to work or increasing your hours, a before or after school club could provide the childcare you need. And if your child has a special educational need or disability (SEND), they could qualify for Including Me funding too.

If you're going back to work or increasing your hours, a before or after school club could provide the childcare you need. And if your child has a disability or special educational need, they could qualify for Including Me funding too. To find out more, we spoke to the Playwork Team from Surrey Early Years and Childcare Service.

Before school and breakfast clubs

Where? Before school and breakfast clubs are normally based at schools but some are at homes, in local church halls or scout huts. The age range normally depends on the age of the school they are based in or near to.

When? Clubs normally run from 7.30am, others start at 7.45am or later. They finish when school starts. Some clubs have been able to move their start times so parents can catch a certain train to work so it's worth asking if the times don’t meet your needs.

What's involved? You should expect to see a table laid for breakfast and children being able to help themselves. The club should meet the Food Standards Agency guidance when planning breakfasts and should have a menu on display. Some clubs invite the teachers to join them for breakfast on a Friday so the children can socialise with them.

There should be a homely feel and after you have signed your child in they should have a healthy breakfast and have time to play before school. You should expect staff to take younger children to their classroom but older children may take themselves.

How much? Costs can be from £2.50 to about £5.50 depending on the length of the session and the breakfast provided. If the club is registered with Ofsted you'll be able to use the childcare element of Working Tax Credits to pay or use Childcare Vouchers.

What else? Clubs may be registered with Ofsted but there are different types of registration depending on the age range and the hours of the club. Staff will have enhanced Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) checks to make sure they're suitable to work with children and young people.

After school clubs

Where? After school clubs could be based at a school, in a classroom, in a local hall, church hall, scout hut or leisure centre. Some clubs will collect from a number of schools to drop off at a main club. Some clubs are run directly by the school, some are privately run and some are run by a voluntary organisation.

When? After school clubs usually run from the end of the school day and finish around 5.30pm to 6pm. You will need to pick your child up from the club and sign them out.

What's involved? Children will be given a light tea which meets the Food Standards Agency guidance.

Children should be able to choose from the activities on offer. There should be labels and photos on the drawers and cupboards so that children can choose their own toys, games and materials. Staff can plan activities and the children can choose what they want to do.

How much? You would normally look at paying between anything from £8 to £15.50 depending on the length of the club and food offered. Some settings offer discounts for siblings. If the club is registered with Ofsted you'll be able to use the childcare element of Working Tax Credits to pay or use Childcare Vouchers.

What else? After school clubs are not homework clubs (see how libraries can help with homework). They're about learning through play, learning new skills, developing and having fun. They should be safe but with opportunities for risk!

The club will likely be registered with Ofsted as after school clubs normally run for longer than two hours but there are different types of registration depending on the age range and the hours of the club. Staff will have enhanced Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) checks to make sure they're suitable to work with children and young people.

All clubs should have policies for you to read and there may be a short version for you to sign. Some clubs have a parent contract that the children have drawn up which you would sign. This may include that the children may get messy so you need to provide different clothes or if you turn up early you must give your child a 10 minute warning.

Finding out more

You can search for clubs in your area using our Childcare Finder (under childcare, type out of school hours club). For more information, including questions to ask when visiting a club, go to Types of childcare.

Including Me
Including Me is a service for children and young people with a special educational need or disability. It provides funding to give them the opportunity to go to a local mainstream breakfast club, after school club or holiday playscheme.

Your child must live in Surrey, be between 4 and 16 years old and go to a specialist school or unit to qualify. Including Me will pay for the extra staff or resources your child needs to fully enjoy their time at the club and interact with their peers that live locally. You just need to pay the normal attendance fee. It also gives you a chance to meet local parents. 

For more information or to register your child, contact the playwork inclusion advisor on 01372 833833, email includingme@surreycc.gov.uk or go to Including Me.

Get into the outdoors with...
 
... The Adventure Zone (TAZ).

Exciting activities in the outdoors - perfect for young adventurers and their families!

TAZ holiday activities run throughout the school holidays between 9.30am and 4.30pm. And TAZ family activities offer time strapped families the opportunity to spend some quality time together doing something different.

Limited offer - 25% off selected activities if booked online before 27 March 2015.

See their flyer for more information or book online at www.surreycc.gov.uk/theadventurezone

Sports coaching apprenticeships
For 16 - 19 year olds
 
First up in our new series about apprenticeships is sports coaching, perfect for teenagers with an enthusiasm for sport, determination and an ability to inspire and motivate others.

In our new series featuring industry sectors offering apprenticeships we'll be giving you greater insight in to the kind of roles available out there for young people. This follows on from our article about which employers in Surrey take on apprentices in the last issue of Parents' Pages.

First up is sports coaching and, in particular, Soccer Coaching Limited (SCL), one of the UK’s leading independent providers of education through sport.

An apprenticeship in sports coaching could be a great option for young people who have an enthusiasm for sport, determination and an ability to inspire and motivate others. And the National Careers Service estimates that there will be almost 10% more people employed in this industry by 2020.

Sports coaches work across a wide range of areas including schools, health clubs, leisure centres and for sports teams, either nationally or internationally. Some of the responsibilities of a sports coach include designing and delivering activities and programmes, providing feedback on performance and providing support at competitions or events. It may also involve the opportunity to travel.

Soccer Coaching Limited
Each year SCL delivers sports and activity-based programmes to over 1 million school children, and educates and develops the skills of young people through apprenticeships. They employ over 150 full-time employees and pride themselves on being a great place to work.

SCLs Operations Director Marcus Headington explains,

“With the government’s commitment to increase youth sport participation and its continued investment in apprenticeships, there has never been a better time for sports coaching companies, specialising in school sport and PE, to up skill their team and take on new teaching and coaching staff to help expand their school sport delivery.

“Apprenticeships are an integral part of SCLs team development and company growth plans. Each year we provide opportunities for 15-20 sports coach apprentices, of which 50-60% go on to full-time employment with the company and the remainder either going on to higher education, scholarships abroad or employment elsewhere. To be able to train, develop and qualify staff, whilst also building their experience working alongside our coaching team, is hugely beneficial. Apprentices not only become proficient and confident in what they do, but they also learn how SCL operates as a company and how we meet the needs of our customers.”

Find out more
For more information about SCL, visit www.scl-online.co.uk

To find out more about apprenticeships visit the Young people and apprenticeships page on the Surrey County Council website or www.apprenticeships.org.uk where you can see case studies, get details about the top 100 national apprenticeship employers and help your teenager search for an apprenticeship that’s right for them.

Looking for disability equipment?
Families
 

SID (Social Information on Disability) has launched a national website where you can buy and sell new and used disability equipment.


SID (Social Information on Disability) has launched a national website where you can buy and sell new and used disability equipment. Organisations and individuals can use the website and you can find equipment at reduced prices or for a donation to charity. It has easy to use search facilities with an advanced search allowing you to filter and sort your results.

Have disability equipment to sell or donate?
The website gives you two ways of listing equipment:

  • As a guest (without the need to register) - you can list several items in one quick and easy process – this service is free for items listed under £50.
  • As a member (ideal if you have lots of items to sell) - registering as a member provides you with a cost effective way of listing new, ex-demo, part-exchanged or used disability equipment. You can manage your own listings and prices start from as little as 8p per day per item.

Listing an item follows an easy step by step process with hints and tips to help you. If you need further help, or using the internet isn’t for you, you can contact the SID Team.

There's a wealth of information on the resources page with links to make sure you have all the information you need before you make any decisions or purchases.

For more information, go to disabilityequipmentservice.org.uk

 

A treasure trove of affordable style
Families
 

Ever wondered what a local furniture reuse showroom is really like? Family Information Service Outreach Officer, Sarah, went to see for herself - she dropped in at Furniturelink Guildford, and discovered an Aladdin’s Cave.


Ever wondered what a local furniture reuse showroom is really like?  Family Information Service Outreach Officer, Sarah, went to see for herself - she dropped in at Furniturelink Guildford, and discovered an Aladdin’s Cave.

“Today I’m visiting Guildford’s best kept secret, Furniturelink, hidden away on a little known industrial estate. I’m met by an enthusiastic bunch of staff and volunteers who are keen to let me browse their eclectic mix of furniture and show me some of the fantastic up-cycling and refurbishment work they do.

"Furniturelink is one of a group of furniture recycling charities that make up the Surrey Reuse Network. Their aim is to supply affordable furniture for all, no matter what you want to use it for, as long as it’s not thrown away.

"I meet Natasha, a one time volunteer and now employee of Furniturelink. When she moved from inner London to Guildford, she found herself short of furniture to fill her new home and short of funds to buy any. After receiving a grant she was told about Furniturelink where she was able to buy a bed and mattress for her son’s room. Because she was claiming benefits at the time she was also able to get other essential items of furniture at a greatly reduced rate. Natasha loves the scheme so much that she offered her time helping them with their administrative work. She’s now employed by the charity and works with other volunteers and paid staff, equally as passionate about the scheme.

"While I’m there a young couple came in, looking to add to their retro style home. They’re just starting up together and want an affordable way to furnish their flat. With an eye for something individual but on a tight budget they buy a G Plan table to take away to restore.

"When a grandmother arrives at the showroom she’s given a warm welcome by the volunteers. She’s become a familiar face over the last few weeks as she lost everything in a house fire, and without insurance hasn’t been able to afford to replace her belongings. She moved to a new property but was short of money to be able to buy a dining table, so the team used their emergency funding to donate one to her.

"Another familiar face pays a visit, she’s been working with the volunteers to learn how to paint and decorate furniture and now does this as a hobby at home. She regularly checks Furniturelink’s Facebook page to see what’s new in and has spotted a Victorian chest of drawers she’s keen to buy.

"Furniturelink receives most of their furniture from private donations ranging from house clearance to individual pieces. Retailers who take away unwanted furniture when they deliver new also supply the charity. Broken pieces are repaired when possible, some pieces are restored, some are up-cycled and others pieces can be bought ‘as seen’. Then the charity tickets each piece with a bargain price.

"Hang on a second, I think I’ve spotted the perfect up-cycled chair for my living room!”

Surrey Reuse Network
Your local furniture reuse showroom is a great place to buy quality furniture and kitchen appliances at bargain prices. It has everything you need to furnish your home for less than you would pay on the high street – including sofas, dining sets, beds and children’s furniture.

The showrooms are run by local charities which together make up the Surrey Reuse Network (SRN). And between them, the charities cover the whole of the county – so there is a showroom nearby for everyone who wants to buy or donate.

Buying furniture from the SRN also means the network can support local families in need, and provide long-term unemployed and disadvantaged people in Surrey with volunteering and work placements.

For locations, to arrange a collection and more information about the SRN, call 0800 082 0180 or visit www.surreyreusenetwork.org.uk

Supporting your child with bereavement
For 5 - 16 year olds
 

The death or serious illness of a family member is devastating and can bring many challenges into the life of a child or young person. But there is support available.


Jigsaw (South East) is a charity providing support to bereaved children and young people and those facing the loss of a loved one. They accept referrals for children from 5 to 16 years old. You can make a direct referral or the referral can come from a professional working with children in health, education or social care. Jigsaw will work with your family and are also able to provide support and advice to your child's school.

Where a family has a life-limiting illness, Jigsaw (South East) work with the Macmillan Family Support service to offer support. They aim to be child-centred and to offer tailored support to your family. This can involve practical, emotional and therapeutic support, including play therapy, drama therapy and using children’s natural means of expression and communication.

They can offer:

  • initial meetings at home or at school
  • individual work with children in the family at home or at school
  • sibling, family or small groups
  • signposting to other agencies and organisations
  • information and advice
  • advice, information and resources and support to professionals working with families and children.

If you would like to refer your child or family to one of these services, call 01342 313895 or email info@jigsawsoutheast.org.uk or look at their website for online support.

Time for sugar swaps
Families
 

Did you know that there are seven sugar cubes in a can of fizzy pop? From sugary cereals to after school snacks and puddings in the evening, it’s surprising just how much sugar there is in some of the food and drinks we give children every day.


Did you know that there are seven sugar cubes in a can of fizzy pop? From sugary cereals to after school snacks and puddings in the evening, it’s surprising just how much sugar there is in some of the food and drinks we give children every day.

This can damage their health because sugar means extra calories which cause fat to build up and this can lead to heart disease, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. Don’t forget that eating too much sugar can also cause tooth decay.

To help you and your kids cut back on sugar all you need to do is sign up to Change4Life Sugar Swaps to find out about healthy alternatives. There are loads of great ideas to help you throughout the day: 

  • Breakfast swap – some cereals are full of sugar so why don’t you try out some healthier alternatives such as porridge? You can add some chopped banana to make it the perfect start to the day for you and your children.
  • Drinks swap – swap those cans of fizzy pop for sugar-free drinks, water or lower-fat milk.
  • After school snack swap – replace chocolate, cake and crisps with carrot sticks or unsalted nuts to keep the kids going through until dinner time.
  • Pudding swap – you can still enjoy a treat in the evening by making a healthy blackberry and apple crunch with some oats and low fat yoghurt. There are lots more tasty pudding recipes on the Change4Life website.

To find out about more ways to reduce your family’s sugary intake and get your FREE pack full of tips and money off vouchers, visit the Healthy Surrey website.

Are memory problems affecting your everyday life?
Families
 

We all forget things but if it starts to be a problem and interfere with our ability to do every day activities then we shouldn’t ignore them.


We all forget things but if it starts to be a problem and interfere with our ability to do every day activities then we shouldn’t ignore them. Forgetting important dates or events, or asking for the same information over and over again are signs to look out for and speak to the GP about. The GP can offer information and advice about a range of support options available and help people continue to lead a full and active life.

Around 15,000 people in Surrey aged over 65 have dementia – that’s one in thirteen older people. This is expected to increase by 25% by 2020 in Surrey alone.

Dementia is the term used for a group of symptoms including loss of memory, mood changes and confusion, caused by diseases of the brain. It is not always easy to tell if someone has dementia as it affects everyone differently and while Alzheimer’s disease is the most common, it is not the only type of dementia.

Most people with dementia are over 65 but younger people are also affected.

Having dementia can mean that people avoid you just when you need your family and friends most. If you know someone with dementia the best thing to do is stay in touch. It’s often the little things that count; popping in for a cup of tea, offering to cut the grass or running an errand could make a big difference to the person with dementia and their carer too!

While dementia can’t be cured, an early diagnosis can mean that the right support and treatments are put in place. Many people continue to work, socialise, take part in hobbies and enjoy loving relationships. As the dementia progresses they may need more help doing everyday things but with the right support they can continue to live a full and active life for as long as possible.

Find local information, advice and support at www.dementiafriendlysurrey.org.uk, sign up to become a Dementia Friendly Surrey champion and discover how you can make your community a better place to live for people with dementia, their families and carers.

Where can I get help with homework?

Is your son or daughter having trouble with their homework?  Would it be useful just to get the answer to that tricky question that is holding up their progress with a subject?

Surrey libraries Homework Help Chat provides immediate online help Monday to Friday from 3.30pm to 5.30pm and Saturday 2pm to 4.30pm.

Or you can Ask Eddie. Fill out the email form and you'll get a list of useful books and websites within two working days. You can also let them know if you need pictures or diagrams.

They also have Project Stuff showing the best websites to help with projects and homework, the Children’s Online Reference Shelf and of course the library catalogue.

So click into the links above or go to Library services for children and teens to find out what your local library can offer your family.

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